Welcome to Eyelash Growth Serum



A good day to start working on Eyelash Growth Serum is today's date of

What is Eyelash Growth Serum?

Eyelash Growth Serum is a drug that promises the user fuller eyelashes.

Thinking of false eyelashes or extensions?

FDA considers false eyelashes, eyelash extensions, and their adhesives to be cosmetic products, and as such they must adhere to the safety and labeling requirements for cosmetics. False eyelashes and eyelash extensions require adhesives to hold them in place. Remember that the eyelids are delicate, and an allergic reaction, irritation, or other injury in the eye area can be particularly troublesome. Check the ingredients before using these adhesives.



Bad Reaction?

If you have a bad reaction to eye cosmetics, first contact your healthcare provider. FDA also encourages consumers to report any adverse reactions to cosmetics. See Bad Reaction to Cosmetics? Tell FDA.

Safety Checklist

If you use eye cosmetics, FDA urges you to follow these safety tips:

  • If any eye cosmetic causes irritation, stop using it immediately. If irritation persists, see a doctor.
  • Avoid using eye cosmetics if you have an eye infection or the skin around the eye is inflamed. Wait until the area is healed. Discard any eye cosmetics you were using when you got the infection.
  • Be aware that there are bacteria on your hands that, if placed in the eye, could cause infections. Wash your hands before applying eye cosmetics.
  • Make sure that any instrument you place in the eye area is clean.
  • Don't share your cosmetics. Another person's bacteria may be hazardous to you.
  • Don't allow cosmetics to become covered with dust or contaminated with dirt or soil. Keep containers clean.
  • Don't use old containers of eye cosmetics. Manufacturers usually recommend discarding mascara two to four months after purchase.
  • Discard dried-up mascara. Don't add saliva or water to moisten it. The bacteria from your mouth may grow in the mascara and cause infection. Adding water may introduce bacteria and will dilute the preservative that is intended to protect against microbial growth.
  • Don't store cosmetics at temperatures above 85 degrees F. Cosmetics held for long periods in hot cars, for example, are more susceptible to deterioration of the preservative.
  • When applying or removing eye cosmetics, be careful not to scratch the eyeball or other sensitive area. Never apply or remove eye cosmetics in a moving vehicle.
  • Don't use any cosmetics near your eyes unless they are intended specifically for that use. For instance, don't use a lip liner as an eye liner. You may be exposing your eyes to contamination from your mouth, or to color additives that are not approved for use in the area of the eye.
  • Avoid color additives that are not approved for use in the area of the eye, such as "permanent" eyelash tints and kohl. Be especially careful to keep kohl away from children, since reports have linked it to lead poisoning.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates all cosmetics marketed in the United States, including mascara, eye shadows, eye liner, concealers, and eyebrow pencils.



Safety experts within the Office of Cosmetics and Colors in FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) offer consumers the following advice:

Keep everything clean. Dangerous bacteria or fungi can grow in some cosmetic products, as well as their containers. Cleanliness can help prevent eye infections.

Always wash your hands before applying eye cosmetics, and be sure that any instrument you place near your eyes is clean. Be especially careful not to contaminate cosmetics by introducing microorganisms. For example, don’t lay an eyelash wand on a countertop where it can pick up bacteria. Keep containers clean, since these may also be a source of contamination.

Don’t moisten cosmetic products. Don’t add saliva or water to moisten eye cosmetics. Doing so can introduce bacteria. Problems can arise if you overpower a product’s preservative capability.

Don’t share or swap. People can be harmed by others’ germs when they share eye makeup. Keep this in mind when you come across “testers” at retail stores. If you do sample cosmetics at a store, be sure to use single-use applicators, such as clean cotton swabs.

Don’t apply or remove eye makeup in a moving vehicle. Any bump or sudden stop can cause injury to your eye with a mascara wand or other applicator.

Check ingredients, including color additives. As with any cosmetic product sold to consumers, eye cosmetics are required to have an ingredient declaration on the label. If they don’t, they are considered misbranded and illegal.

In the United States, the use of color additives is strictly regulated. Some color additives approved for cosmetic use in general are not approved for areas near the eyes.

If the product is properly labeled, you can check to see whether the color additives declared on the label are in FDA’s List of Color Additives Permitted for Use in Cosmetics.

Use only cosmetics intended for the eyes on the eyes. Don’t use a lip liner as an eye liner, for example. You may expose eyes either to contamination from your mouth or to color additives that are not approved for use near the eyes.

Say “no” to kohl! Also known as al-kahl, kajal, or surma, kohl is used in some parts of the world for enhancing the appearance of the eyes. But kohl is unapproved for cosmetic use in the United States.

Kohl contains salts of heavy metals such as antimony and lead. Reports have linked the use of kohl to lead poisoning in children.

Some eye cosmetics may be labeled with the word "kohl" only to indicate the shade, not because they contain true kohl.

A product’s “ingredient statement” should not list kohl—this is not an FDA-approved color additive. Check the ingredient statement to make sure that kohl is not present.

Don’t dye eyelashes and eyebrows. No color additives are approved by FDA for permanent dyeing or tinting of eyelashes and eyebrows. Permanent eyelash and eyebrow tints and dyes have been known to cause serious eye injuries.